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Commercial ReelPaul Graham
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Let me know what you're looking for or just ask me a question:

paul@paulgrahamvoiceovers.com

G

-voiceover-

a professional

Paul Graham Voiceovers logo

Right, let's cut to the chase here. You want a voice. Not just any voice, but one that will fit your project like a glove and make it shine brighter than a supernova, yes?

A voice that will entice and persuade. A unique voice which tempts and... oh, I think you get the picture here. 

You will have already heard my voice, out there in the multi-verse. I've chatted away for the BBC, Discovery Channel, Sky and many others.

 

And talking of chatting, that's something we should do to take this to the next step.

I've got a right posh audio studio to record for you. Microphones, sound baffles, Adobe Audition and a cat basket. She keeps me centred...

Over to you now. Have a peruse of this vocal services list to see which one is best for you. Then ring me. Or write. Whatever, but do it now so we can get started in bringing your project to life.

voiceovers

et yourself

frequently asked questions

>  I've got a script, I just need your voice


Paul Graham Voice overs Contact me straight away! Either by email or phone, and let's get the ball rolling.




> I'm having a think, and need a quote


No problem. I'll need to know a bit of information to sort out a quote first. Usually I'll ask you how many words are you thinking of. You might not be at that stage though, so let's have a quick chat by email or phone, and then I can get a better idea and give you a rough quote, for starters.




> How long does it take to record a voice over?


Well, it all depends on how many words there are for me to record, how many changes you would like after the first recording and lots of other different factors, really. Have a think about the number of words in particular, then drop me a line ASAP and let's have a quick chat, either by email or on the phone, about your job.




> Have you got a pro sound studio?


Yes, something I'm very proud of. I've worked in many broadcasting studios and picked up lots of tips and hints from sound engineers to get the best out of a studio. My studio is fully lined with sound baffles to ensure a totally dead sound. I use a very high quality Rode NT-1 microphone, connected via a pre-amp to a fast Windows 10 pc. I use Adobe Audition to record into and for any edits, dubs or mixes or just plain, raw audio to send direct to you.




> I'm not sure of what 'voice' I need


That can be a conundrum! By all means, have a listen to the different styles that I can bring to a recording. I have quite a few bits of recorded audio, starring my own voice, right here.




> I have a question that you haven't answered here


By all means do get in touch and I'm sure I can help reassure you. You can either call me direct (although I might not be able to answer if I'm recording) or send me an email. I can also arrange a short meeting if you have a few questions you need answering.





 

about me​​

​I’m Paul Graham; a BBC professionally trained voiceover artist, narrator, broadcaster and actor. I’m also proud to be born and bred in Manchester, UK.

 

My career has included voice over work for over 20 years. You might have heard me in film and television projects, radio and TV commercials, documentaries, corporate narration or e-learning projects.

 

I am also a scriptwriter, copywriter and book writer, so I know a few things about words!

 

my voice training

I have received coaching from the very best. My presenter work with the BBC, in both radio and TV projects, has further honed my skills.

My type of voice is one of those rich Northern English accents.

 

I am also a voice over artist capable of character voices in a recording session.

 

Paul Graham in purple!

"a very british voice"

your next step

If this sounds good to you, and you want things to grow and flourish, then why not have a listen to some of my example’s here.

 

My voice can help your business.

stay up to date

You want to know the latest deals from me. You need to hear my latest demos. You have to know when I'm offering exclusive discounts.

Sign up now and keep up to date. And I promise I won't spam you!

book me here or via Voquent

Link to Paul Graham's Voquent agency

did you know?

Most video watchers note that they are more likely to stop watching a video with bad audio vs. lower-quality video.

 

In fact, a TechSmith study of video viewing habits showed that more than 25% of video viewers watched a video all the way through because the audio was good — more than those who said professional video style was most important.

So great audio isn’t just important.

It’s necessary to keep an audience interested and engaged.

are you a media student?

I lectured in radio and television at Salford University, so I know the financial problems students have to cope with.

If you are a media student and are creating a documentary then take advantage of my free offer.

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what is a voiceover?

just in case you wanted clarity

A bit of background for you, here. Voice overs can be broken down in many ways. The use of a voice over artist and their 'invisible' voice is so common as we hear them on films and television programmes, as well as commercials and audiobooks. And lots more beside!

 

Let's start off with the presentation side.

Voice-over (also known as off-camera or off-stage commentary) is a production technique where a voice—that is not part of the narrative (non-diegetic)—is used in a radiotelevision productionfilmmakingtheatre, or other presentations.

 

The voice-over is read from a script and may be spoken by someone who appears elsewhere in the production or by a specialist voice talent.

 

Synchronous dialogue, where the voice-over is narrating the action that is taking place at the same time, remains the most common technique in voice-overs.

Dubbing audio for a film

Asynchronous, however, is also used in cinema. It is usually prerecorded by production companies and placed over the top of a film or video and commonly used in documentaries or news reports to explain information.

 

Voice-overs are used in computer games and on-hold messages, as well as for announcements and information at events and tourist destinations.

 

It may also be read live for events such as award presentations.

 

It is not to be confused with the process of replacing dialogue with a translated version, which is called dubbing or revoicing.

use of voiceovers in marketing

The commercial use in television advertising and radio commercials has been popular since the beginning of radio broadcasting.

In the early years, before effective sound recording and mixing, announcements were produced "live" and at-once in a studio with the entire cast, crew and, usually, orchestra. A corporate sponsor hired a producer, who hired writers and voice actors to perform comedy or drama.

Manufacturers will often use a distinctive voice to help them with brand messaging, often retaining talent to a long-term exclusive contract.

The industry expanded very rapidly with the advent of television in the 1950s, and the age of highly-produced serial radio shows ended.

 

The ability to record high-quality sound on magnetic tape also created opportunities. Digital recording, thanks to the proliferation of PCs, smartphones (iOS and Android 5.0+), dedicated recording devices, free or inexpensive recording and editing software, and USB microphones of reasonable quality, and the increasing use of home studios, has revolutionized the industry.

The sound recording industry uses the term "presence" as the standard of a good quality voice-over and is used for commercial purposes in particular. Radio stations often use the same voice in their trails to give a good presence.

 

The term "presence" measures the legitimacy of how a voice sounds, specifically one of a voice-over. Advances in technology for sound recording have helped voice-overs reach that standard.

 

These technological advances have increasingly diminished "the noise of the system...and thus reducing the distance perceived between the object and its representation."

The voice-over industry works in tandem with the advertising industry to help deliver high-quality branding and, as a whole, is worth millions.

 

Commercial advertising that uses voice-overs reaches about 89 percent of all adults in Britain alone.